October 21, 2021

Mark Kennedy (musician)

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Burton, McGuire & Kennedy all left de Castro in June 1973 to form an eponymous trio.[19] They added Doyle in August and have turn out to be Ayers Rock, a jazz fusion, progressive rock group, by September.[14][19] That group’s lead single was a cover mannequin of “Girl Montego”, which moreover appeared on their debut album, Massive Crimson Rock (November 1974).[14][19]

Mates appeared on the Sunbury Pop Pageant in January 1973 as a six-piece – Kennedy, de Castro, Inexperienced, Martin, McGuire and Oliver.[16][18] Three of their performances “Lucille”, “Fowl on a Wire” and “La La Track”, have been recorded for a dwell 3× LP album, Sunbury 1973 – The Nice Australian Rock Pageant (April) by quite a few artists on Mushroom Data.[14][18] Quickly after Inexperienced, Martin and Oliver left and, in April, Ray Burton joined on guitar (ex-Delltones, Executives). In June a four-piece line-up of Kennedy, Burton, de Castro and McGuire carried out “Freedom Practice” and McGuire’s newly written monitor, “Girl Montego”, at one in every of many final live performance occasions at The Garrison venue. The tracks have been issued on the dwell album, Garrison: The Last Blow, Unit 1, by quite a few artists on Mushroom Data.[14][16]

In August 1972 Mates launched a single, “B-B-Boogie”, which rock music historian, Ian McFarlane, described as “distinctive arduous rock”.[16] Duncan Kimball of MilesAgo web page felt it was a “sturdy boogie-rock amount.”[14] The monitor was co-written by Kennedy with de Castro, McGuire and Tumahai.[17] Kimball hottest the B-side, “Freedom Practice”, which he opined was a “driving, prog-jazz” monitor that “grew to turn out to be their signature tune”, it was “among the many best Australian progressive recordings of the ’70s.”[14] McFarlane seen that it was a “jubilant jazz-tinged” work.[16]

By March 1971 Kennedy and McGuire had left King Harvest to affix Doug Parkinson in Focus, which have been a pop rock group led by Parkinson on vocals.[8][10] Resulting from approved disputes Parkinson found difficulties in recording in the mean time, although they launched a single, “Purple Curtains” (September 1971).[11] Additionally all through that yr Cadd invited Kennedy and McGuire to work on Russell Morris’ album, Bloodstone (August 1971).[12] By December Kennedy and McGuire had joined Leo de Castro & Mates.[13] The preliminary line-up included MacKenzie, Tim Martin on saxophone and flute, and Charlie Tumahai on vocals and percussion (Therapeutic Drive, Chain).[13][14] Mates appeared on the inaugural Sunbury Pop Pageant in January 1972.[15]

In September 1970 Kennedy formed King Harvest as a progressive rock group with Leo de Castro on vocals and guitar, Jimmy Doyle on guitar (Silhouettes, Aesop’s Fables, Moonstone), Duncan McGuire on bass guitar (Phantoms, Epics, Questions, Doug Parkinson in Focus, Rush) and Steve Yates on keyboards (Rush, Expression). Billy Inexperienced on guitar (Doug Parkinson in Focus) modified Doyle; Inexperienced, in flip, was modified by Rob MacKenzie, after which by Ray Oliver (The Mild).[8] In January 1971 King Harvest issued a cover mannequin of “Wichita Lineman”, which peaked at No. 35 on the Nationwide High 60.[9]

Rudd described Kennedy’s affect on Spectrum: “[he] truly carried us by means of the first yr because of people would say ‘Wow, take a look at that drummer, they need to be an incredible group’… He used to play points like drum solos!, nonetheless he was glorious. By the equivalent token, I was practically relieved to get away from that ‘set off the emphasis swung once more to the material and the band often pretty than one participant.”[4] However, the group’s debut single, “I will Be Gone” (January 1971), which had been recorded whereas Kennedy was nonetheless a member, reached No. 1 on the Go-Set Nationwide High 60 singles chart.[7]

Rudd remembered meeting Kennedy and Putt for the first time “Invoice, in truth being enormously tall, and Mark actually being a tiny little fella – he ought to’ve been spherical 5’3″ or 4″ or one factor… there was an astonishing kinda disparity between the two.”[5] Kennedy remained with Spectrum until they recorded their debut album, Spectrum Half One (March 1971), in August 1970.[2][3] He had “misplaced endurance” as a result of the group “struggled for gigs (promoters found them ‘too progressive’).”[3]

Mark Kennedy was born on 20 August 1951 in Melbourne, Victoria and grew up there. Kennedy was educated in classical piano on the Melbourne Conservatorium of Music for six years.[1] In 1968 he was the drummer for Gallery, alongside Invoice Putt on lead guitar.[2][3][4] Putt recalled that that they’d “Three girl singers in precise temporary apparel, me on guitar, a bass-player and Mark Kennedy on drums.”[5] In April 1969 Kennedy and Putt, now on bass guitar, formed a progressive rock group, Spectrum, with Lee Neale on organ (ex-Nineteen87), and Mike Rudd on guitar, harmonica and lead vocals (ex-Chants R&B, The Occasion Machine).[2][3][4] Brian Cadd had wished Kennedy for his group, Axiom, “He had the type of funky, slinky, laid-back trend now we have been looking out for.”[6]

Mark Kennedy (born 20 August 1951) is an Australian musician who has been the drummer for a lot of artists along with Spectrum (1969–70), Doug Parkinson in Focus (1971), Leo de Castro (1971–73), Ayers Rock (1973–76), Marcia Hines (1976–83), Males at Work (1985), Renée Geyer (1985–86, 1995–96) and Jimmy Barnes (2005).

(1951-08-20) 20 August 1951 (age 69)
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

(1951-08-20) 20 August 1951 (age 69)
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

#Mark #Kennedy #musician

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